Harsh Visuals of War Leave Newsrooms Facing Tough Choices

Digital disinformation and restrictions on photojournalists have complicated decision-making about the visual chronicle of the Israel-Hamas war.

Reporting Jobs in Journalism: The Inside Scoop on A Career Behind the Byline

If you’ve got an ear finely tuned to the whispers of a city, an insatiable curiosity that borders on nosy, and a knack for telling stories that make people stop and think, then you, my friend, are cut out for a reporting job in journalism. Let’s deep-dive into the nitty-gritty of this fast-paced profession.

I think journalism gets measured by the quality of information it presents, not the drama or the pyrotechnics associated with us.

Bob Woodward

What Exactly Does a Reporter Do?

Reporters are the field agents of journalism, always on the prowl for news and crafting stories that serve the public good. Whether you’re working for a newspaper, a TV station, or an online outlet, you’ll be the magician turning mundane press releases into headline news, weaving together in-depth features, and sometimes even exposing scandals. “Journalists educate the public about events and issues and how they affect their lives… They spend a lot of time in the field, conducting interviews and investigating stories,” from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The landscape is incredibly dynamic. Imagine one moment you’re tucked into a city council meeting, notebook in hand, and the next you’re out interviewing a community hero. It’s like a box of chocolates; each day serves something different.

Required Skills for Reporting Jobs, Anyone?

The ideal reporter is adventurous, intensely curious, and armed with a healthy dose of skepticism—because, let’s face it, not everyone you meet will tell you the truth. Rock-solid research skills are given, and the savvy reporter knows how to tap into social media for leads and contacts. Adapting to different topics, tones, and sometimes even other mediums is a must. Oh, and let’s not forget, you have to write compellingly.

Flexibility and Resilience

In this line of work, flexibility isn’t just an excellent quality; it’s a requirement. You’ll often find yourself tweaking your approach to align with different subject matters or editorial guidelines. And let’s talk resilience. Deadlines are unforgiving and stressful, sources can be fickle, and yes, criticism is part of the job. That’s journalism for you.

Do Reporters Have Uniform Job Responsibilities?

Well, not exactly. The essence of reporting—staying atop current events, digging deep, and relaying information—remains the same across the board. However, the subject matter can vary wildly. One reporter might specialize in politics, while another dives into lifestyle and entertainment. The roles can even be more specific when working for large news agencies covering specialized beats like cybersecurity or the electric vehicle industry.

Who’s the Boss?

Hierarchies vary based on where you’re employed. You might find yourself reporting to an Editor, a News Director, or even directly to an audience if you’re freelancing.

Side Hustles and Sibling Jobs

Feature writers, columnists, and even some content creators are doing work similar to reporting, just framed differently. Dabbling in these areas can add flair to your stories or offer a fresh challenge.

The Evolving Landscape of Journalism

  • Data-Driven Stories: The rise of big data is arming reporters with tools to craft more in-depth and factual stories.
  • Multimedia Reporting: If you’re just writing, you’re behind the times. Video, podcasts, and interactive elements are the new norms.
  • Ethics and Responsibility: In an era rife with fake news, ethical reporting is not just a catchphrase; it’s a solemn responsibility.
  • Global Audience: The internet has blown the doors off traditional geographic boundaries, so understanding how to communicate to a diverse audience is key.

Breaking into Reporting Jobs

You might find that a journalism degree gives you a leg up, but it’s not strictly necessary. A solid portfolio showcasing your skill and passion for storytelling will get you through the door. Freelancing can offer a path to accumulating those crucial bylines.

So, are you ready to chase stories, dig deep, and make your mark in journalism? Your byline awaits.

Check out open reporting positions and other media jobs on Mediabistro’s job board.

Brave Commerce Podcast: Campbell Soup Company CEO on the Core Strategies for CPG Success

On this episode of Brave Commerce, Mark Clouse, CEO at Campbell Soup Company, joins hosts Rachel Tipograph and Sarah Hofstetter to talk about core strategies and challenges that have defined Campbell’s success over the years. As the conversation begins, Clouse delves into the strategic emphasis of Campbell’s transformation, rooted in the concept of focus. He…

The First 90 Days in a Journalism Career: Your Insider Guide to Navigating the Newsroom

So you’ve unpacked your bags, set up your desk, and brewed that first cup of newsroom coffee. Welcome to the bustling, chaotic, and downright enthralling world of journalism. You’re probably a mix of excitement, nervousness, and curiosity, like a cub reporter on the hunt for their first big scoop. So, let’s help you navigate the maze that is your first three months in a journalism career.

Month 1: Settle In but Don’t Settle Down

Your first month in a journalist role is all about orientation, but let’s not kid ourselves; this isn’t summer camp. Expect to get your first assignments quickly, sometimes within days or even hours. Use this time wisely:

  • Know Your Team: Take time to meet editors, senior reporters, and even the tech guys who can save you when your computer crashes.
  • Learn the Tools: Familiarize yourself with the Content Management System (CMS), social media protocols, and any news-gathering software your outlet uses.
  • Digest the Style Guide: Every publication has its idiosyncrasies in how they like their stories told. Learn them.
  • File Your First Story: Don’t aim for a Pulitzer. Your first stories will likely be small pieces to test the waters. Focus on accuracy and clarity.

Month 2: Flex Those Reporting Muscles

Alright, you’ve dipped your toes; now let’s dive in. The second month is about upping the ante.

  • Pitch Stories: By now, you should have a feel for what kind of stories resonate with your audience and editors. Start pitching.
  • Expand Your Network: Continue to meet more people both inside and outside your newsroom. You never know who might give you your next big story.
  • Experiment with Formats: If your newsroom allows it, try your hand at different types of stories: feature pieces, interviews, and maybe even some multimedia content.
  • Feedback Loop: Make it a habit to seek feedback from your editors and even your peers. It’s the fastest way to grow.

Month 3: Find Your Groove

You’re no longer the ‘new kid’—well, at least not the newest. Month three is about refining your process and starting to specialize:

  • Own Your Beat: Whether it’s politics, culture, or technology, start to focus more on the areas that interest you. Become the go-to person for that subject in your newsroom.
  • File Faster: You should be comfortable enough to produce stories more quickly without sacrificing quality. Deadlines are the bread and butter of this industry.
  • Explore Side Projects: Got an idea for a podcast or a video series? Pitch it. Newsrooms love initiative.
  • Self-Review: Look back at your articles from the first and second months. Notice the improvements and understand where you need to focus more.

Quickfire Tips for Your First 90 Days:

  • Stay Curious: Always be on the hunt for stories, even when you’re off the clock.
  • Verify, Verify, Verify: Never sacrifice accuracy for speed. A retraction can set you back far more than a missed deadline.
  • Respect Off-the-Record: If someone says it’s off the record, it stays off the record. Period.
  • Listen More Than You Speak: The best stories often come when you let other people do the talking.
  • Stay Humble: You’re going to make mistakes. Own them, learn from them, and move on.

Congratulations! You’ve made it through the initiation of your first three months in journalism. From here on out, the stories are more significant, the deadlines tighter, and the coffee probably just as terrible. But hey, you’re in it for the bylines, not the brews, right? Welcome to the tribe.

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Work-life balance is a goal we all strive to achieve. When your work seeps into your personal life, it can cause stress and burnout. But what if your career makes it impossible to make that separation?

When you’re a lifestyle writer, you often have the most success when you write about your own life and experiences. While this may challenge the ideal work-life balance, that’s not always a bad thing. Here are the benefits of having a connected work and personal life as a writer.

Why Do People Need Work-Life Balance?

Work-life balance entails a proper divide between your professional life and your personal life. You have set hours when you’re in “work mode” and complete your tasks. You’re able to shut off your computer for the day without worrying about work until tomorrow.

Many people have careers that don’t let them have this luxury. You may need to be on-call for emergencies or bring work home with you if it’s time-sensitive. Being a freelance writer may not be the first job that comes to mind here, but many people who pursue it are surprised to learn how much work-life overlap it entails.

How do you take a break when work is so integral to your livelihood? As a lifestyle writer, you probably enjoy aspects of your work. You have plenty of freedom to write about things people care about and connect with your audience over shared experiences.

Lifestyle writing can take many forms. Some lifestyle writers might run personal blogs where they document their lives and share personal stories. Others may write for magazines where they cover trending topics in their area of interest. You may also write reviews, personal essays or opinion pieces.

Personal experience is key in making any of these types of pieces valuable–whether it be your findings after testing a product or your insight as someone who has gone through a relatable life event. While sharing your life and opinions can put you in a vulnerable position and blur the line between work and personal life, that’s what makes lifestyle writing so compelling.

3 Benefits of the Mutual Work-Life Relationship of a Writer

When you’re a writer, your work follows you everywhere. Maybe it isn’t always looming over you, stressing you out with the threat of a deadline. Sometimes, it sits quietly in the corner, waiting for you to notice it. Your writer’s work-life balance may look like you acknowledging your writing when you’re ready and on your own time. Here are some of the benefits you can reap by keeping your two lives together.

1. You Can Connect With Others

Lifestyle writers have the opportunity to share their experiences with others who are going through the same situations. When people struggle with their health, their jobs or their family lives, they often feel alone and ashamed. Studies show that loneliness can have consequences for your physical health, so opening conversations about difficult situations can help people feel less alone.

This is why mom blogs are often so successful. They create a space for moms to share advice and acknowledge their shared challenges. Whether you write in detail about your personal life or use your experiences to share more general advice, you can help others get through tough times.

2. You Find Inspiration in Anything

Writers, like other artists, have the amazing ability to look around and find inspiration. Whether you people-watch or analyze every interaction you have with others, you’ll find a story or lesson in something every day. Pay attention to the world around you. You never know when you might find something you can use to teach or entertain your readers.

Travel writers, for example, capitalize on a unique combination of work and personal life. Traveling for pleasure has many benefits, including relieving stress, boosting your creativity and cognitive functions, and exposing you to new experiences. While most people go on vacation to get away from work, travel writers can use any trip they take as new material while reaping the mental health benefits.

3. You Can Implement New Tips

The average YouTube user spends almost 24 hours a month watching videos, often to learn something new. Every writer has to research something. As educated or experienced as you might be, you haven’t lived through every situation in the world. You’ll have to learn new things when you’re writing, things that can transfer into your personal life.

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2. You Find Inspiration in Anything

Writers, like other artists, have the amazing ability to look around and find inspiration. Whether you people-watch or analyze every interaction you have with others, you’ll find a story or lesson in something every day. Pay attention to the world around you. You never know when you might find something you can use to teach or entertain your readers.

Travel writers, for example, capitalize on a unique combination of work and personal life. Traveling for pleasure has many benefits, including relieving stress, boosting your creativity and cognitive functions, and exposing you to new experiences. While most people go on vacation to get away from work, travel writers can use any trip they take as new material while reaping the mental health benefits.

2. You Find Inspiration in Anything

Writers, like other artists, have the amazing ability to look around and find inspiration. Whether you people-watch or analyze every interaction you have with others, you’ll find a story or lesson in something every day. Pay attention to the world around you. You never know when you might find something you can use to teach or entertain your readers.

Travel writers, for example, capitalize on a unique combination of work and personal life. Traveling for pleasure has many benefits, including relieving stress, boosting your creativity and cognitive functions, and exposing you to new experiences. While most people go on vacation to get away from work, travel writers can use any trip they take as new material while reaping the mental health benefits.

2. You Find Inspiration in Anything

Writers, like other artists, have the amazing ability to look around and find inspiration. Whether you people-watch or analyze every interaction you have with others, you’ll find a story or lesson in something every day. Pay attention to the world around you. You never know when you might find something you can use to teach or entertain your readers.

Travel writers, for example, capitalize on a unique combination of work and personal life. Traveling for pleasure has many benefits, including relieving stress, boosting your creativity and cognitive functions, and exposing you to new experiences. While most people go on vacation to get away from work, travel writers can use any trip they take as new material while reaping the mental health benefits.

2. You Find Inspiration in Anything

Writers, like other artists, have the amazing ability to look around and find inspiration. Whether you people-watch or analyze every interaction you have with others, you’ll find a story or lesson in something every day. Pay attention to the world around you. You never know when you might find something you can use to teach or entertain your readers.

Travel writers, for example, capitalize on a unique combination of work and personal life. Traveling for pleasure has many benefits, including relieving stress, boosting your creativity and cognitive functions, and exposing you to new experiences. While most people go on vacation to get away from work, travel writers can use any trip they take as new material while reaping the mental health benefits.

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ork-life balance is a goal we all strive to achieve. When your work seeps into your personal life, it can cause stress and burnout. But what if your career makes it impossible to make that separation?

When you’re a lifestyle writer, you often have the most success when you write about your own life and experiences. While this may challenge the ideal work-life balance, that’s not always a bad thing. Here are the benefits of having a connected work and personal life as a writer.

Why Do People Need Work-Life Balance?

Work-life balance entails a proper divide between your professional life and your personal life. You have set hours when you’re in “work mode” and complete your tasks. You’re able to shut off your computer for the day without worrying about work until tomorrow.

Many people have careers that don’t let them have this luxury. You may need to be on-call for emergencies or bring work home with you if it’s time-sensitive. Being a freelance writer may not be the first job that comes to mind here, but many people who pursue it are surprised to learn how much work-life overlap it entails.

How do you take a break when work is so integral to your livelihood? As a lifestyle writer, you probably enjoy aspects of your work. You have plenty of freedom to write about things people care about and connect with your audience over shared experiences.

Lifestyle writing can take many forms. Some lifestyle writers might run personal blogs where they document their lives and share personal stories. Others may write for magazines where they cover trending topics in their area of interest. You may also write reviews, personal essays or opinion pieces.

Personal experience is key in making any of these types of pieces valuable–whether it be your findings after testing a product or your insight as someone who has gone through a relatable life event. While sharing your life and opinions can put you in a vulnerable position and blur the line between work and personal life, that’s what makes lifestyle writing so compelling.

3 Benefits of the Mutual Work-Life Relationship of a Writer

When you’re a writer, your work follows you everywhere. Maybe it isn’t always looming over you, stressing you out with the threat of a deadline. Sometimes, it sits quietly in the corner, waiting for you to notice it. Your writer’s work-life balance may look like you acknowledging your writing when you’re ready and on your own time. Here are some of the benefits you can reap by keeping your two lives together.

1. You Can Connect With Others

Lifestyle writers have the opportunity to share their experiences with others who are going through the same situations. When people struggle with their health, their jobs or their family lives, they often feel alone and ashamed. Studies show that loneliness can have consequences for your physical health, so opening conversations about difficult situations can help people feel less alone.

This is why mom blogs are often so successful. They create a space for moms to share advice and acknowledge their shared challenges. Whether you write in detail about your personal life or use your experiences to share more general advice, you can help others get through tough times.

2. You Find Inspiration in Anything

Writers, like other artists, have the amazing ability to look around and find inspiration. Whether you people-watch or analyze every interaction you have with others, you’ll find a story or lesson in something every day. Pay attention to the world around you. You never know when you might find something you can use to teach or entertain your readers.

Travel writers, for example, capitalize on a unique combination of work and personal life. Traveling for pleasure has many benefits, including relieving stress, boosting your creativity and cognitive functions, and exposing you to new experiences. While most people go on vacation to get away from work, travel writers can use any trip they take as new material while reaping the mental health benefits.

3. You Can Implement New Tips

The average YouTube user spends almost 24 hours a month watching videos, often to learn something new. Every writer has to research something. As educated or experienced as you might be, you haven’t lived through every situation in the world. You’ll have to learn new things when you’re writing, things that can transfer into your personal life.

Instead of your life directly influencing your writing, this benefit reverses them. You can take messages away from your writing, such as a cleaning tip you learned through research, and apply it to your life. You might pick up a new active hobby because you wrote about the benefits, or quit a bad habit after learning about the risks. You never know how your work can affect your life until you let it.

Embrace Work-Life Balance Without the Separation

You don’t have to remove yourself entirely from work when you’re a writer. While you don’t want to be in “work mode” all the time, you can still benefit from keeping your eyes and ears open for inspiration to use in your writing. Learn to let the ideas come to you and write them when you’re ready.

cora gold writer

Author bio: Cora Gold is a freelance writer and editor of women’s lifestyle magazine, Revivalist. As a freelancer, Cora writes about wellness and balancing work with family. Connect with Cora on LinkedIn and Twitter.

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ork-life balance is a goal we all strive to achieve. When your work seeps into your personal life, it can cause stress and burnout. But what if your career makes it impossible to make that separation?

When you’re a lifestyle writer, you often have the most success when you write about your own life and experiences. While this may challenge the ideal work-life balance, that’s not always a bad thing. Here are the benefits of having a connected work and personal life as a writer.

Why Do People Need Work-Life Balance?

Work-life balance entails a proper divide between your professional life and your personal life. You have set hours when you’re in “work mode” and complete your tasks. You’re able to shut off your computer for the day without worrying about work until tomorrow.

Many people have careers that don’t let them have this luxury. You may need to be on-call for emergencies or bring work home with you if it’s time-sensitive. Being a freelance writer may not be the first job that comes to mind here, but many people who pursue it are surprised to learn how much work-life overlap it entails.

How do you take a break when work is so integral to your livelihood? As a lifestyle writer, you probably enjoy aspects of your work. You have plenty of freedom to write about things people care about and connect with your audience over shared experiences.

Lifestyle writing can take many forms. Some lifestyle writers might run personal blogs where they document their lives and share personal stories. Others may write for magazines where they cover trending topics in their area of interest. You may also write reviews, personal essays or opinion pieces.

Personal experience is key in making any of these types of pieces valuable–whether it be your findings after testing a product or your insight as someone who has gone through a relatable life event. While sharing your life and opinions can put you in a vulnerable position and blur the line between work and personal life, that’s what makes lifestyle writing so compelling.

3 Benefits of the Mutual Work-Life Relationship of a Writer

When you’re a writer, your work follows you everywhere. Maybe it isn’t always looming over you, stressing you out with the threat of a deadline. Sometimes, it sits quietly in the corner, waiting for you to notice it. Your writer’s work-life balance may look like you acknowledging your writing when you’re ready and on your own time. Here are some of the benefits you can reap by keeping your two lives together.

1. You Can Connect With Others

Lifestyle writers have the opportunity to share their experiences with others who are going through the same situations. When people struggle with their health, their jobs or their family lives, they often feel alone and ashamed. Studies show that loneliness can have consequences for your physical health, so opening conversations about difficult situations can help people feel less alone.

This is why mom blogs are often so successful. They create a space for moms to share advice and acknowledge their shared challenges. Whether you write in detail about your personal life or use your experiences to share more general advice, you can help others get through tough times.

2. You Find Inspiration in Anything

Writers, like other artists, have the amazing ability to look around and find inspiration. Whether you people-watch or analyze every interaction you have with others, you’ll find a story or lesson in something every day. Pay attention to the world around you. You never know when you might find something you can use to teach or entertain your readers.

Travel writers, for example, capitalize on a unique combination of work and personal life. Traveling for pleasure has many benefits, including relieving stress, boosting your creativity and cognitive functions, and exposing you to new experiences. While most people go on vacation to get away from work, travel writers can use any trip they take as new material while reaping the mental health benefits.

3. You Can Implement New Tips

The average YouTube user spends almost 24 hours a month watching videos, often to learn something new. Every writer has to research something. As educated or experienced as you might be, you haven’t lived through every situation in the world. You’ll have to learn new things when you’re writing, things that can transfer into your personal life.

Instead of your life directly influencing your writing, this benefit reverses them. You can take messages away from your writing, such as a cleaning tip you learned through research, and apply it to your life. You might pick up a new active hobby because you wrote about the benefits, or quit a bad habit after learning about the risks. You never know how your work can affect your life until you let it.

Embrace Work-Life Balance Without the Separation

You don’t have to remove yourself entirely from work when you’re a writer. While you don’t want to be in “work mode” all the time, you can still benefit from keeping your eyes and ears open for inspiration to use in your writing. Learn to let the ideas come to you and write them when you’re ready.

cora gold writer

Author bio: Cora Gold is a freelance writer and editor of women’s lifestyle magazine, Revivalist. As a freelancer, Cora writes about wellness and balancing work with family. Connect with Cora on LinkedIn and Twitter.

Here Are the Winners of the 2023 Adcolor Awards

Industry awards shows are known for being uplifting affairs, and Adcolor’s weekend gathering in Los Angeles did not skimp on its displays of positivity, pomp and passion. But along with saluting the cream of the crop in creative fields, the 17th annual event also spotlighted the harsh realities facing people of color and marginalized communities…

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Colle McVoy Hires Ciro Sarmiento as Chief Creative Officer

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Creativity Does Not Thrive in Fear—How Marketers Can Drive Real-World Change

It’s a consequential time to be a brand. Every day, social, political and economic issues are creating flashpoints in culture that provoke opposing opinions and concerns. And businesses are feeling the effects: 64% of people would either buy from a brand or boycott it, solely because of its position on a social issue. Most brands…

Creativity Does Not Thrive in Fear—How Marketers Can Drive Real-World Change

It’s a consequential time to be a brand. Every day, social, political and economic issues are creating flashpoints in culture that provoke opposing opinions and concerns. And businesses are feeling the effects: 64% of people would either buy from a brand or boycott it, solely because of its position on a social issue. Most brands…

75 Gift Ideas for Wellness Enthusiasts – From Functional Sea Moss Gels to Ancient Herbal Gummies (TOPLIST)

(TrendHunter.com) The wellness movement has grown substantially as consumers begin to take more interest in their overall health. Whether you’re looking to celebrate someone’s wellness journey, show…

Angel Reese Is Taking Her Game to the Next Level—and Bringing Brands With Her

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Book Review: ‘Network of Lies,’ by Brian Stelter

His book is a thrilling account of the conspiracy to steal the 2020 election, the attack on the Capitol, Tucker Carlson’s defenestration and more.

Unleashing the Power of Tech Marketing