Facebook Changes How Advertisers Are Charged for Video Ads

Advertisers are given the option to pay for video ads only if users view them for at least 10 seconds.


Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence – Not A Toy – (2015) :50 (USA)

Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence - Not A Toy - (2015) :50 (USA)
There seems to be no shortage of lobbying groups concerned about gun violence in the USA. Filmmaker Anthony Wilson directed the latest in a series of Commonsense Solution toolkits from the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence and Americans for Responsible Solutions.

The installment, Commonsense Solutions: State Gun Laws to Protect Kids from Unintended Shootings, addresses the urgent need to keep children safe from firearms in the home, just like Evolve was, last year, however Evolve chose to tackle the topic with humor.

Wilson decided to go the emotional route, and he directed this pro-bono. This PSA was produced by Patrick Malloy with Executive Producer Rania Hattar. You can read more at www.smartgunlaws.org

Through the metaphorical use of a young boy, the symbol of our young country, and the backdrop of classic Americana; Wilson asks us to follow him as he seeks to understand what this object’s purpose is. In the end, reality shows the young boy, our young country, what the sole purpose of a gun is. It is an instrument of death; and we should hold that notion close to us when we decide who should wield this power and how.
Too many families have needlessly suffered the devastation of a child lost to a poorly stored gun. Almost 1.7 million children under the age of 18 live in homes with loaded, unlocked firearms, making them 16 times more likely to be killed in unintentional shootings than in other high-income countries. Commonsense requirements for gun storage and handling can protect the littlest among us from preventable tragedies.
The toolkit is a comprehensive legal resource for state legislators and activists that offers detailed proposals for smart gun laws and in-home best practices to keep kids from accessing firearms. Recommendations include secure locking methods, warning labels, and child access prevention laws, which hold adults liable when children gain access to deadly weapons.
The Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence has made addressing the deadly intersection of kids and guns one of its top policy priorities in 2015. The Law Center’s 22nd Anniversary Dinner held on June 18 in San Francisco, focused on smart gun laws that protect children, and honored Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. and Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer for founding the organization Prosecutors Against Gun Violence and all their efforts to reduce gun violence against children. The dinner also honored Mark Barden, who lost his son in the shooting at Sandy Hook and now serves as advocacy director for Sandy Hook Promise.

Great Nations Eat: We put a man on the Moon

Advertising Agency: BBH, New York, USA

Great Nations Eat: Germany for America

Advertising Agency: BBH, New York, USA

Great Nations Eat: Slovenia for America

Advertising Agency: BBH, New York, USA

U.K. Watchdog Bans 'Beach Body Ready' Ad, but Not Because It's Offensive


Despite 378 public complaints about Protein World’s infamous “Beach Body Ready” ad, the U.K. Advertising Standards Authority has ruled that it is neither irresponsible nor offensive.

The poster, created in-house and showing a very slim woman in a yellow bikini next to the phrase “Are You Beach Body Ready?” was the subject of a public backlash in April, when 60,000 people signed an online petition to have it banned. A graffiti campaign defaced many of the ads, using slogans like, “Each body’s ready” and “You are fine as you are,” and a “Take back the beach” protest was organized in Hyde Park.

Carling produced a spoof “beer body ready” version, and plus-sized fashion retailer Simply Be created posters declaring “Every body is beach body ready,” while the term “beach body ready” became part of daily conversation in the U.K.

Continue reading at AdAge.com

Apple Music Makes Its Debut With a Mix of Tracks

If Apple Music is successful, it could deliver billions of dollars in revenue to the music industry and establish streaming music as a stable business.


Googles new "real-time trends" for journalists should be targeted by lobbyists

Why settle for just publishing rumours found on twitter, when we can have journalism based on metarumours, i.e., rumours about rumours, thanks to Googles “biggest expansion of Google trends since 2012” as announced on the Google blog here. This “new window” into the world with real-time trends serves up results based on what people are searching for ” the questions and topics we search for can tell us a great deal about who we are and what we care about” – thus creating real-time trends. If you’ve been even five minutes on Twitter – now a top “current” result in Googles search engine – you know that someone publishing a single tweet at the right time can start rumours that eventually will be considered truths no matter how often they’re disproven. A photo from one conflict can be reused to spout propaganda about a current one. Rejoice, journalists, at this new tool spoonfeeding you what the astroturfing lobbyists and trolls of all stripes want you to see as news. We don’t even need “activists journalists” any longer, just enough activist twitterers and searchbots.

Many newsrooms are already using Google data to inform and shape their reporting. Here are a few examples:
The Washington Post launched an interactive data visualization on climate change where viewers can discover the most pressing environmental issues in various cities.
The Guardian and Buzzfeed used Trends data to tell the story of the recent U.K. election; Buzzfeed produced a map of most-searched party leader in each constituency, and the Guardian used trends during the campaign to showcase what voters were asking Google about the candidates.
HLN integrated Google Trends data into their television programming during LGBT Pride Month to explore when terms like “transgender” became widely used around the world.
CNN Politics published monthly updates on search interest and top questions around U.S. Presidential candidates as they announce their candidacy.

Below Ezra Klein, Mariana Santos, David Leonhart and Mona Chalabi among others explain how data has driven journalism since the dawn of journalism, this is just a new better quicker tool for finding it. Welcome to “data journalism”. Google explains that this tool is birthed from “feedback we’ve collected through conversations with hundreds of journalists and others around the world—so whether you’re a reporter, a researcher, or an armchair trend-tracker, the new site gives you a faster, deeper and more comprehensive view of our world through the lens of Google Search.” As an example Google shows this Buzzfeed article about Google election maps.

“In addition to Search, we now look at trends from YouTube and Google News and combine them to better understand what topics and stories are trending across the web right now. ” So in other words, a well trafficked gif-laden rumour-engine that takes idle gossip on twitter as a serious source can start the trending. Churnalism is now but a tiny step away from programmatic journalism, because why bother employing human writers at this point? Just throw some animated gifs in each article and call it a day.

I can’t wait to see the first successful trolling that then is covered in earnest by all Guardian, Vox, Buzzfeed and friends because it trended in searches and on youtube. It’s only a matter of time.

MINI: Minitospace

Advertising Agency: Gloo@Ogilvy, Johannesburg, South Africa
Creative Director: Gregory King
Art Directors: Jared Gower, Neill Pretorius, Clinton Jordaan
Copywriters: Gregory King, Clinton Jordaan, Alison McCrae
Illustrators: Neill Pretorius, Clinton Jordaan
Photographer: Neill Pretorius / Wolf Gang Production
Additional credits: Graham Fry, Charles Ash, Wolf Gang Production, SentToSpace
Published: November 2014

E-Co: Vacuum cleaner

100% pure energy.

Advertising Agency: Involve!, Oslo, Norway
Creative Director / Art Director: Jørgen Marthinsen
Copywriter: Espen Aarbake Johnsen
Illustrator / Photographer: Igor R Nilsen
Project manager: Sha Pakdel
Published: May 2015

E-Co: Lamp

100% pure energy.

Advertising Agency: Involve!, Oslo, Norway
Creative Director / Art Director: Jørgen Marthinsen
Copywriter: Espen Aarbake Johnsen
Illustrator / Photographer: Igor R Nilsen
Project manager: Sha Pakdel
Published: May 2015

E-Co: Iron

100% pure energy.

Advertising Agency: Involve!, Oslo, Norway
Creative Director / Art Director: Jørgen Marthinsen
Copywriter: Espen Aarbake Johnsen
Illustrator / Photographer: Igor R Nilsen
Project manager: Sha Pakdel
Published: May 2015

E-Co: Cell phone

100% pure energy.

Advertising Agency: Involve!, Oslo, Norway
Creative Director / Art Director: Jørgen Marthinsen
Copywriter: Espen Aarbake Johnsen
Illustrator / Photographer: Igor R Nilsen
Project manager: Sha Pakdel
Published: May 2015

E-Co: Mixer

100% pure energy.

Advertising Agency: Involve!, Oslo, Norway
Creative Director / Art Director: Jørgen Marthinsen
Copywriter: Espen Aarbake Johnsen
Illustrator / Photographer: Igor R Nilsen
Project manager: Sha Pakdel
Published: May 2015

Vilnius Book Fair: Alice

Stories are good. Crime stories are better.

Advertising Agency: Adell Taivas Ogilvy, Vilnius, Lithuania
Creative Directors: Tomas Karpavicius, Dominykas Zilenas
Art Director: Giedrius Kumetaitis
Copywriter: Tadas Cislikauskas
Illustrator: Augustas Bidlauskas
Published: January 2015

Vilnius Book Fair: Gulliver

Stories are good. Crime stories are better.

Advertising Agency: Adell Taivas Ogilvy, Vilnius, Lithuania
Creative Directors: Tomas Karpavicius, Dominykas Zilenas
Art Director: Giedrius Kumetaitis
Copywriter: Tadas Cislikauskas
Illustrator: Augustas Bidlauskas
Published: January 2015

Vilnius Book Fair: Don Quixote

Stories are good. Crime stories are better.

Advertising Agency: Adell Taivas Ogilvy, Vilnius, Lithuania
Creative Directors: Tomas Karpavicius, Dominykas Zilenas
Art Director: Giedrius Kumetaitis
Copywriter: Tadas Cislikauskas
Illustrator: Augustas Bidlauskas
Published: January 2015

Great Nations Eat: China for America

Advertising Agency: BBH, New York, USA

Vilnius Book Fair: Metamorphosis

Stories are good. Crime stories are better.

Advertising Agency: Adell Taivas Ogilvy, Vilnius, Lithuania
Creative Directors: Tomas Karpavicius, Dominykas Zilenas
Art Director: Giedrius Kumetaitis
Copywriter: Tadas Cislikauskas
Illustrator: Augustas Bidlauskas
Published: January 2015

Rest in Peace, Publicis Kaplan Thaler

Oh look, the rumors we’ve all heard FOR MONTHS are true: Publicis Kaplan Thaler is no more.

September 2014 feels like forever ago, but back then our sources made several claims about PKT: that all three of Publicis’ New York offices would be consolidated into the 1675 Broadway location; that there would be “departures” at the executive level; that the resulting shop would revert to the Publicis New York moniker. President/CCO Rob Feakins got fired in November, and all the other claims turned out to be true as well.

This story has essentially been common knowledge in the New York agency world for well over six months, and now it’s official: Goodbye PKT. Meet the new Publicis New York.

We’re not sure why Publicis waited so long to make this announcement or why they offered us no comment on our completely accurate tips for nine months; the PKT URL and email addresses disappeared back in May. But the new name is the last step in a “rebranding” of sorts that comes after the agency unveiled its new Pinterest-like global logo and named Andy Bird of Publicis London as its new chief creative officer.

The answer to the inevitable question regarding Linda Kaplan Thaler: she will “continue in her role as chairman of the New York office,” and Susan Gianinno will also continue in her role as North American chairman of the larger Publicis organization.

Linda Kaplan Thaler’s statement from the release:

“Kaplan Thaler is truly part of the Publicis DNA, and we are proud of the evolution that this name-change represents. I could not imagine a better salute to what we have all created together here in New York than to have our office carry forward the flagship banner under the global brand name and identity.”

It would seem, then, that the name change is just that for now. No word on the current status of the Publicis-wide pay freeze, which was 100 percent true no matter what the agency’s PR department in Paris wants to tell us.